SayJack » Japanese

Negative Form of Japanese Verbs and ない-Form

To study this grammar point, please make sure you understand the following:

In English, you may simply use the word not to negate the meaning of a verb. But in Japanese, it is done by modifying the suffix of the verb.

Negative Plain Form of Japanese Verbs

To derive the negative plain form, you need to identify the ない-stem of the verb by identifying if it is a う-verb, る-verb, or an irregular verb.

ない-Stem of a Japanese Verb

  • る-verb: Remove る to get the stem
  • う-verb: If the last kana is う, change it to わ; Otherwise change the last kana from う-column (the 3rd column) to あ-column (the 1st column)
  • する-verb: The stem is し
  • くる-verb: The stem is こ

The negative plain form of a verb is to add ない at the end of the ない-stem.

There is one exception for the verb ある (to exist).

The negative plain form of the verb ある is simply ない.

Examples (more)

Plain Form ない-Stem Negative Plain Form
る-verbs 食べる 食べ 食べない
いる いない
起きる 起き 起きない
寝る 寝ない
う-verbs 行く 行か 行かない
飲む 飲ま 飲まない
書く 書か 書かない
買う 買わ 買わない
する-verb する しない
くる-verb 来る(くる) 来(こ) 来ない(こない)
Exception ある ない

Negative Polite Form of Japanese Verbs

See polite form of Japanese verbs.

Polite Form of Japanese Verbs and ます-Stem

When you look up a verb in a dictionary, it is written in plain form which you would say casually in your daily life.

In order to modify a Japanese verb from its dictionary form to polite form, you need to identify the ます-stem of the verb by identifying if it is a う-verb, る-verb, or an irregular verb.

ます-Stem of a Japanese Verb

  • る-verb: Remove る to get the stem
  • う-verb: Change the last kana from う-column (the 3rd column) to い-column (the 2nd column)
  • する-verb: the stem is し
  • くる-verb: the stem is き

Present Polite Form of Japanese Verbs

The present polite form of a verb is to add ます at the end of the ます-stem.


Past Polite Form of Japanese Verbs

The negative polite form of a verb is to add ました at the end of the ます-stem.


Negative Polite Form of Japanese Verbs

The negative polite form of a verb is to add ません at the end of the ます-stem.


Negative Past Polite Form of Japanese Verbs

The negative past polite form of a verb is to add ませんでした at the end of the ます-stem.


Warning: the suffix of polite negative past tense form of verbs is not ないでした.

Examples (more)

Plain Form ます-Stem Present Polite Negative Polite Past Polite Past Negative Polite
る-verbs 食べる 食べ 食べます 食べません 食べました 食べませんでした
いる います いません いました いませんでした
起きる 起き 起きます 起きません 起きました 起きませんでした
寝る 寝ます 寝ません 寝ました 寝ませんでした
う-verbs 行く 行き 行きます 行きません 行きました 行きませんでした
ある あり あります ありません ありました ありませんでした
飲む 飲み 飲みます 飲みません 飲みました 飲みませんでした
書く 書き 書きます 書きません 書きました 書きませんでした
買う 買い 買いません 買いません 買いました 買いませんでした
する-verb する します しません しました しませんでした
くる-verb 来る(くる) 来ます(きます) 来ません 来ました 来ませんでした

Compare the sentences of using the polite form and the casual way of saying the same meanings:


Verb To Be だ and です in Japanese

To study this grammar point, please make sure you understand the following:

Unlike English, Japanese makes no distinction for the choice of verb to be (am, are, is) between first-person, second-person and third-person subjects.

Nonetheless, Japanese grammar distinguishes between plain (casual) form and polite form by either the choice of words, or the modified form of the words.

The plain form for is, am, are in Japanese is . The polite form, which is more common in introductory textbooks, is です.

However, the plain form だ and its modified forms are way more important for Japanese grammar, and students should understand their usages.

The plain form verb to be だ and its modified forms are very important in understanding Japanese grammar.

Summary for Japanese Verb To Be (Present, Past, Present Negative)

is, am, are was, were is not, am not, are not
Plain Form だった じゃない
Polite Form です でした じゃないです or ではありません

Is, Am, Are (Present Tense)

  • plain form: だ
  • polite form: です

Recall that the subject of a sentence can be omitted (if it is understood by the context), and verb is always at the end of a Japanese sentence.

学生だ。
I am a student.
(casual form)
学生です。
I am a student.
(polite form)

Notice that 学生 (student) is a noun in the sentence. For adjective in such a sentence, such as I am fine, the rules are slightly different. You can learn it from sections for い-adjectives and な-adjectives.

You can also use a noun without any verb to be. It is still a good sentence.

学生。
I am a student.
(casual form)

Was, Were (Past Tense)

  • plain form: だった
  • polite form: でした
学生だった。
I was a student.
(casual form)
学生でした。
I was a student.
(polite form)

Is Not, Am Not, Are Not (Present Negative)

  • plain form: じゃない
  • polite form: じゃないです or ではありません
学生じゃない。
I am not a student.
(casual form)
学生ではありません。
I am not a student.
(polite form)

Notice that じゃないです is the more common spoken form, and ではありません /dewa-arimasen/ is more formal form for the written format.

Was Not, Were Not (Past Negative)

It is the same rules to derive the past-negative form for い-adjectives (because the suffix ない can be considered as an い-adjective).

Past Tense of Japanese Verbs and た-Form

To study this grammar point, please make sure you understand the following:

In English, you may simply add -ed to change a verb to its past tense. In Japanese, it is done by modifying the suffix of the verb.

Plain Past Tense (た-Form) of Japanese Verbs

Japanese plain past tense has the most complicated rules for its modified forms, but still the rules are highly regular (with only one exception). Notice that even it is also called た-form, it may have た or だ as its suffix.

る-verbs Ending with Replace with
→ た
う-verbs Ending with Replace with
→ した
→ いた
→ いだ
る, う or つ → った
む, ぶ or ぬ → んだ
Irregular verbs Replace with
する → した
くる → きた

Exception: The た-form of 行く is 行った.

Examples (more)

Plain Present Plain Past Plain Negative Negative Past
る-verbs 食べる 食べた 食べない 食べなかった
いる いた いない いなかった
起きる 起きた 起きない 起きなかった
寝る 寝た 寝ない 寝なかった
う-verbs 行く 行った 行かない 行かなかった
飲む 飲んだ 飲まない 飲まなかった
書く 書いた 書かない 書かなかった
ある あった ない なかった
買う 買った 買わない 買わなかった
出す 出した 出さない 出さなかった
する-verb する した しない しなかった
くる-verb 来る(くる) 来た(きた) 来ない(こない) 来なかった

Polite Past Tense Form of Japanese Verbs

See polite form of Japanese verbs.

Negative Form of Japanese Adjectives

To study this grammar point, please make sure you understand the following:

In English, you may simply use the word not to negate the meaning of an adjective. But in Japanese, it is done by modifying the suffix of the adjective.

Rules for Negative Form of Japanese Adjectives

  • な-adjective: keep the stem of the adjective (without な), and add じゃない.
  • い-adjective: keep the stem of the adjective, and change い to く, and add ない.
  • Exception: いい (means good) becomes よくない

Notice that suffix ない means not in Japanese, and all negative forms effectively become い-adjectives as they end with ない.

Examples for な-adjectives:

  • げんき → げんきじゃない (not healthy)
  • すき → すきじゃない (dislike)
  • しずか → しずかじゃない (not quiet)
  • べんり → べんりじゃない (not convenient)

Examples for い-adjectives:

  • おおきい → おおきくない (not big)
  • あつい → あつくない (not hot)
  • おもしるい → おもしるくない (not interesting)
  • あかい → あかくない (not red)
  • いい → よくない (not good)

You always use this plain form as a noun-modifier:

大きくない人。
A person who is not big.

The polite form is used at the end of a sentence by adding です to the negative form, just like how you would do for the positive form.


Page 3 of 812345...Last »